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College Archives

Current Exhibits

Current Archives Exhibits include:

La Imprenta en la Nueva España - located in the Reference Room of Jenks Library - Closing Sept. 2022

One Body: Preserving a Diverse Legacy - located in the Reference Room of Jenks Library - Closing Sept. 2022

A Brief Glimpse of Native American Art and the Art it Has Inspired - located outside the Archives (Jenks 217)

A Brief Glimpse of Native American Art and the Art it Has Inspired

A Brief Glimpse of Native American Art and the Art it Has Inspired

Curated by Dante-Christian DiLorenzo (Archives Intern - Summer 2022)

 

This exbibit displays pieces from several different tribes. While they all share similarities, they are distinct groups with unique cultures and traditions. It is the curator’s hope that viewer’s will gain a new appreciation and interest in the topic of native tribes and their cultures.

 

Disclaimer: The following books and illustrations may use harmful and outdated terms to reference Native Americans. These materials were published in the late-1800s-early 1900s and should be viewed through the context of that time period. Where possible the curator and archival staff have avoided the overt use of potentially harmful terms. We have also tried to identify the individual tribe or nation, but some artifacts did not credit a specific Native American nation.

 

About the Vining Collection

The Vining Collection was the personal library of Edward Payson Vining (1847-1920) and was donated by his family to Gordon College in 1921. The collection consists of over 7,000 books, manuscripts, and letters, ranging from the 12th century to the early 20th century. It contains over 900 Bibles in 140 languages and is rich in Shakespeareana, Early Americana, geography, travel literature, ethnology, and especially philology - with vast holdings in indigenous languages. 

Example pages showing four black and white illustrations. On the left-hand side is an sketch of two indigenous women grinding corn. On the right hand-side are three examples of Native American pottery (two bowls and a vase). The bowls are decorated in geometric patterns while the vase is decorated with things you would see every day such as birds and wheat.

Native American Pottery

On the left-hand side of the image above, two female members of the Southwestern Pueblo tribe can be seen grinding corn. On the right-hand page are three examples of pottery. Though very far from New England, the Pueblo people were skilled stone workers and pottery sculptors and much of their works can still be seen today

Learn more about the Pueblo tribe by visiting their website.

Image: Illustrations showing women grinding corn (to the left) and examples of Pueblo pottery including what looks like bowls and a vase (to the right) from The American Continent and Its Inhabitants Before Its Discovery by Columbus (1890). (Vining E 61 .C12 1894 v.1 pt.1)

Brown cloth cover with a golden image of a Native American on the back of horse. The Native American man is wearing a headdress and holding a spear. There are mountains outlined in black in the background as well as some birds in black.

The Story of the American Indian (1887)

Image: Cover of The Story of the American Indian, 1887 (Vining E 77 .B87)

A black and white pencil sketch of an Iroquois longhouse. The long house has segmented sections and there is smoke coming from sections of the roof.

Iroquois Longhouse

Longhouses, like the one pictured here, were used by many of the Northeastern tribes. Its popularity was primarily due to its housing capabilities and heat retention in cold weather.

Learn more about the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois, Confederacy by visiting their website.

Image: An pencil sketch illustration of a Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois, Longhouse from The Story of the American Indian, 1887 (Vining E 77 .B87).

Example pages from The American Indian in the United States, Period 1850-1914. The left-hand page is an image in sepia tones of a Native American man standing on top of a hill or cliff. He is dressed in clothing with fringes possibly on the legs or arms. He also has bow at his side.

The American Indian in the United States, Period 1850-1914 (1914)

Image: Example pages, including an image titled "The Last Outpost" (right-side of page) from The American Indian in the United States, Period 1850-1914, 1914 (Vining E 93 .M8)

Framed image of four painted portraits of Native Americans. There are two women and two men drawn.

Artwork Portraying Native People

A suspected 18th century work depicting Native American men and women. These portraits were found in the Gordon College Archives though little is known about their origin.

Image: Possible 18th century artwork.

Map of Native American Tribes

There are hundreds of Indigenous people groups that have distinct history, language, and culture. Find out more about what Indigenous territories you are living on by visiting Native Land Digital

Image: Map of Native American tribes in 1650 from the United States as well as portions of Mexico and Canada. 

La Imprenta en la Nueva España

An engraving of an example of a printing press

La Imprenta en la Nueva España

Curated by Damon DiMauro

The Bay Psalm Book, issued in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1640, has been much heralded as the first book printed in the North American colonies. It was not by any means, however, the first book printed in the New World. For over a hundred years, emissaries of the Spanish Crown and Church had been at work producing catechisms, devotional works, missionary narratives, sermons, grammars, dictionaries, travel literature, maps, natural histories, etc.

In 1539, the Archbishop of Mexico City, Juan Zumárraga, obtained permission from Charles the V, King of Spain, to have a printing press sent from Europe to New Spain. Seville-based publisher Juan Cromberger provided Italian printer Giovanni Paoli—better known under his Spanish name Juan Pablos—with the necessary equipment and materials to set up a print shop in Mexico City. Pablos immediately set about publishing Viceregal- and Church-related documents. He would eventually oversee the printing of at least 37 books between 1539 and his death in 1560.

The earliest work issued from Juan Pablos’ press dates from 1539. Written by Archbishop Juan de Zumárraga himself, both in Spanish and in the indigenous language of Nahuatl, it was entitled Breve y más compendiosa doctrina Christiana en lengua Mexicana y Castellana. In 1559, nine years after Zumárraga’s death, the Mexican church, for mysterious reasons, briefly banned the work. The hint of heresy perhaps explains why no copies are known to have survived to this day. Throughout the centuries, the Doctrina breve has taken on the status of a literary Holy Grail, as researchers, bibliophiles, and antiquarians have attempted to track down an extant copy.

As print culture developed in New Spain, Catholic teaching did not remain the only focal point. Works on indigenous languages, histories, and customs also began to be published and widely disseminated. One which stands out preeminently is Alonso de Molina’s Vocabulario en lengua Castellana y Mexicana, a bilingual dictionary of Spanish and Nahuatl, edited by Juan Pablos in 1555. A Spanish native, Molina had emigrated to Mexico with his parents in 1522 and had learned the native tongue at a young age while playing with monolingual Nahuatl-speaking children in the streets of the former Aztec capital. He later served as an interpreter for early Spanish missionaries. Molina’s masterwork, originally titled Aquí comiença un vocabulario en la lengua Castellana y Mexicana, constitutes the first dictionary of any kind to be printed in the New World. Gordon College owns a copy of this editio princeps, which has been described as “one of the world’s rarest books.” Gordon College also owns the definitive edition of Molina’s work (1571), which added a Nahuatl-to-Spanish section that the original did not include. It was edited by Antonio de Espinosa, the first type cutter and founder in the Americas, and it is generally considered a typographical tour de force.

Another highlight belonging to Gordon College is Manuel Perez’ Cathecismo romano, traducido en castellano, y mexicano (1723). It has pride of place as the first Spanish translation of the Roman Catechism, since the Inquisition, after the Council of Trent (1545-63), had pronounced any and all vernacular versions prohibited. Perez’ work is also noteworthy in terms of the history of translation studies. To communicate Christian concepts, he eschews his own Eurocentric perspective and adopts that of his recipients, thus rejecting Latin and Spanish loan words, while instead adapting existing Nahuatl words for new uses or having recourse to circumlocutions and neologisms.

These rare items are here now on display, with other examples of early Latin-American works from the Vining Collection.

Image: Engraving of a printing press

Painting of Juan Zumárraga, Archbishiop of Mexico

Juan Zumárraga (1468-1548)

Image: Painting of Juan Zumárraga (1468-1548), Archbishop of Mexico.

Black and white photo of E.P. Vining

The Vining Collection

The summer of 2021 marked the 100th anniversary of the gift of the Vining Collection. It was bequeathed as a memorial to Edward Payson Vining (1847-1920), who himself had been, according to the institution’s 1921 catalogue, “sympathetic with the scholarly work and evangelical loyalty of Gordon College.” The collection consists of some 7,000 books, manuscripts, and letters, ranging from the 12th century to the early 20th century. It boasts over 900 Bibles in 140 languages. It is also rich in Shakespeareana, Early Americana, geography, travel literature, ethnology, and especially philology—with vast holdings in indigenous languages.

Vining had made his fortune as a “railroad man,” serving for many years as freight manager of the Union Pacific Railroad and later as general manager of the San Francisco street-railway system. His career took him far and wide, putting him literally on the map, for the town of Vining, Kansas was named in his honor. After his retirement in his early 50s, he devoted the remainder of his life to book collecting and research. Vining authored an eclectic array of scholarly studies and had working knowledge of some fifty languages. In his most ambitious foray into philology and ethnology—an 800-paged monograph titled An Inglorious Columbus (1885)—he contended that Buddhist monks from Afghanistan had first discovered America in the 5th Century. As a scholar, Vining is mainly remembered for his work on Shakespeare. He was a founding member of the New York Shakespeare Society and edited the Hamlet volume of the organization’s republication of the Bard’s collected works (1888). In The Mystery of Hamlet (1881), his most significant contribution to the field, Vining advanced the unorthodox theory that the dithering “prince” was in fact a woman who posed as a man to preserve the succession of the Danish throne. His hypothesis shaped Danish actress Asta Nielsen’s 1920 version of Hamlet for the silver screen and also earned him a fleeting mention in James Joyces’ Ulysses (Ch. IX). Vining was an autodidact and never attended college. He did, however, receive an honorary A.M. from Yale University in 1886 and was granted an LL.D. degree from William Jewell College in 1908. He was also a trustee at the University of Chicago (1886-88).

Image: Edward Payson Vining

Black and white photo of Charles Otis

Charles Otis

In 1919, well into his seventh decade, Edward Payson Vining sought to donate his library of rare books to the Tremont Temple Baptist Church in Boston. The minister at the time, Cortland Myers, declined, citing lack of space and suggesting the books “should be somewhere of real usefulness.” The following year, Vining was struck by an electric car while crossing the street in Brookline and died less than two months later, leaving the collection without a home. As former Gordon President Nathan Wood later wrote, “An unplanned episode occurred out of the clear blue sky when Charles Otis of New York telephoned and asked if Gordon wanted the Vining Library.” Otis was Vining’s son-in-law and the publisher of the Wall Street Journal. In accepting the bequest, the college saw itself as the “custodian” for “the benefit of scholars at large as well as those within its own walls,” so that “Generations of scholars for the ministry and mission field [might] multiply the influence of the Christian scholarship of Edward Payson Vining.” At the same time, Otis became a trustee and dedicated himself to the school for the remaining twenty-five years of his life. According to Wood, a main feature of Otis’ devotion to the “Gordon College of Theology and Missions was that his ‘tithing’, which he interpreted as a tenth of the gross, not the net, income of the business.” This “led to steady giving to the School of some thousands of dollars a year, which as he said ‘didn’t cost him anything, because they were there, waiting to be assigned.’” On more than one occasion, when the institution was in financial straits, Otis came to the rescue with his largess.  

Image: Photo of Charles Otis

Sample pages from Vocabulario en lengua castellana y Mexicana (1555)

Vocabulario en lengua castellana y Mexicana (1555)

First edition of Alonso de Molina’s Vocabulario en lengua castellana y Mexicana, published in Mexico City by Juan Pablos in 1555, the first dictionary to be published in the New World. It has been described as “one of the world’s rarest books.”

Image: Example pages of Vocabulario en lengua castellana y Mexicana (Vining PM 4066 .M7)

Example pages from Vocabvlario en lengva Castellana y Mexicana (1571)

Vocabvlario en lengva Castellana y Mexicana (1571)

First edition of Alonso de Molina’s Vocabvlario en lengva Castellana y Mexicana, published in Mexico City by Antonio de Espinosa in 1571, which included the Nahuatl-to-Spanish section that the original did not have. Espinosa originally worked for Juan Pablos as a type cutter and founder (the first in the Americas), but in 1558 he founded his own press. His second edition of Molina's Vocabulario has been described as a tour de force, as it exhibits his vast typographical resources. Most folio volumes printed in New Spain were gathered in single sheets, but this edition is a folio “in eights,” in other words, four nested sheets per gathering.

Image: Example pages from Vocabvlario en lengva Castellana y Mexicana (Vining PM 4066 .M72 1571)

Example pages from Manual para administrar a los indios del idioma cahita los santos sacramentos

Manual para administrar a los indios del idioma cahita los santos sacramentos (1740)

First edition of Manual para administrar a los indios del idioma cahita los santos sacramentos, on the administration of the Holy Sacraments, printed in Mexico City in 1740 and attributed to the Jesuit Father Diego Pablo González. The Cáhita were a group of indigenous peoples that inhabited the northwest coast of Mexico. They spoke about 18 closely related dialects of the Cáhita language. When first encountered by the Spaniards in 1533, they numbered some 115,000. Despite initial resistance to the Spanish conquest, by the 17th century they had largely been converted to Christianity.

Image: Example pages from Manual para administrar a los indios del idioma cahita los santos sacramentos (Vining PM 3561 .Z71 1740)

Example pages from Cathecismo romano, traducido en castellano, y mexicano

Cathecismo romano, traducido en castellano, y mexicano (1723)

First and only edition of Manuel Perez’ bilingual Cathecismo romano, traducido en castellano, y mexicano (1723), boasting the first Spanish translation of the Roman Catechism after the Council of Trent. The work is also important in the history of translation, given Perez’ innovative—non-Eurocentric—approach in making use of circumlocutions, neologisms, and other adapted Nahuatl words.

Image: Example pages from Cathecismo romano, traducido en castellano, y mexicano (Vining PM 4068.8 .P52 1723)

Example pages from Arte de la lengua mexicana con la declaración de los adverbios della

Arte de la lengua mexicana con la declaración de los adverbios della (1645)

Horacio Carochi’s Arte de la lengua mexicana con la declaración de los adverbios della (1645) is a grammar of the Nahuatl language. The Florentine Jesuit’s classic work is deemed by linguists today to be the most excellent of the early extant grammars of the Nahuatl language. He had keen insight into the Nahuatl language and was the first grammarian to propose an accurate transcription of difficult phenomena in Nahuatl phonology, to wit vowel length and the saltillo (glottal stop). Carochi was proficient in Otomi as well, for which he also wrote a grammar, though it is now lost.

Image: Example pages from Arte de la lengua mexicana con la declaración de los adverbios della (Vining PM 4063 .C27 1645)

Example pages from Arte de la lengua general del Ynga llamada Qquechhua

Arte de la lengua general del Ynga llamada Qquechhua (1691)

Estevan Sancho de Melgar’s Arte de la lengua general del Ynga llamada Qquechhua was published at Diego de Lyra’s printing press in Lima, Peru in 1691. The author was a Lima native and an expert in the Quechua language (i.e. the lingua franca of the former Incan Empire). The variety of Quechua used in communication for ecclesiastic and administrative purposes in the Andean territories of the Spanish Empire in the late 16th century and first half of the 17th century has often been referred to as “lengua general” (“common language”). It is said Sancho de Melgar’s late 17th-century grammar already reflects a language stage appreciably different from Standard Colonial Quechua since there are regional innovations.

Image: Example pages from Arte de la lengua general del Ynga llamada Qquechhua (Vining PM 6303 .S4 1691)

Example pages from Advertencias para los confessores de los naturales (Part 1)

Advertencias para los confessores de los naturales (1600 part 1)

Friar Juan Bautista’s Advertencias para los confessores de los naturales or “Advice for the Confessors of Natives” is a handbook for Spanish missionaries. The two-volume set was published by Melchior Ocharte in 1600 at the Franciscan convent in Tlatelolco. It is marked by the biases of the times, i.e. with a less than positive view of indigenous language and culture. Bautista opines at one point that indigenous penitents are less likely to confess properly, since what he perceives to be imprecise phrasing in Nahuatl is enough to make the native confession suspect. For instance, he claims there is less precision in the Nahuatl “aço Pedro momecatitinemi” than the Spanish “Pedro está amancebado,” which both signify that Pedro cohabitates with a woman who is not his wife.

Image: Example pages from Advertencias para los confessores de los naturales (Vining PM 4068.4 .B4 1600 pt.1)

Example pages from Advertencias para los confessores de los naturales (Part 2)

Advertencias para los confessores de los naturales (1600 part 2)

Image: Example pages from Advertencias para los confessores de los naturales (Vining PM 4068.4 .B4 1600 pt.2)

Camino del cielo en lengua mexicana (1611)

Martin de León’s Camino del cielo en lengua mexicana consists of a catechism, confessional, and church calendar in Nahuatl, with Spanish on facing pages. It was published in Mexico City by Diego López Dávalos in 1611. Dávalos used the type and press inherited from his father-in-law, Antonio de Espinosa, who had arrived in Mexico City in 1551, where he worked as a type founder and die cutter for Juan Pablos. He was thus known as “the second printer in the New World.”

Image: Example pages from Camino del cielo en lengua mexicana (Vining PM 4068 .L4 1611)

Example pages from Vocabvlario de la lengva general de todo el Perv llamada lengua Qquichua, o del Inca

Vocabvlario de la lengva general de todo el Perv llamada lengua Qquichua, o del Inca (1608)

Diego González Holguín was a member of the Spanish Jesuit mission during the era of the Viceroyalty of Peru. He also made himself a scholar of Quechua languages. In 1607, he published a grammar that documented “Classical Quechua,” spoken in the contemporary Incan court. He followed up in 1608 by publishing his Vocabvlario de la lengva general de todo el Perv llamada lengua Qquichua, o del Inca, on display here, which was the first dictionary of the Cusco dialect. It was edited by Francisco del Canto, the second printer to work in Lima. He was an early collaborator of Antonio Ricardo, an Italian from Turin who had arrived on the Peruvian coast in 1581. Ricardo was thus the first printer in South America. Del Canto succeeded Ricardo when the latter was summoned to appear before the Inquisition in 1605.

Image: Example pages from Vocabvlario de la lengva general de todo el Perv llamada lengua Qquichua, o del Inca (Vining PM 6306 .G6 1608)

Example pages from Confessionario En Lengua Mexicana y Castellana

Confessionario En Lengua Mexicana y Castellana (1599)

The Franciscan Juan Bautista’s bilingual Confessional in Nahuatl and Spanish, Confessionario En Lengua Mexicana y Castellana, was a one of the first books published at the convent in Tlatelolco, on the outskirts of México. It was printed by Melchior Ocharte. He was the fifth printer in Mexico, having inherited his press from his father, Pablo Ocharte, a Frenchman who arrived in New Spain circa 1549. Pablo Ocharte married the daughter of printer Juan Pablos and later took over the operation of his press. In 1572, he was incarcerated by the Inquisition, as one of his publications was considered heretical.

Image: Example pages of Confessionario En Lengua Mexicana y Castellana (Vining PM 4068.4 .B42 1599)

Example pages from Arte de la lengua general del reyno de Chile, con un dialogo chileno-hispano muy curioso

Arte de la lengua general del reyno de Chile, con un dialogo chileno-hispano muy curioso (1765)

Catalan Jesuit Andrés Febrés was active in 18th-century Colonial Chile. He is best known for his work Arte de la lengua general del reyno de Chile, con un dialogo chileno-hispano muy curioso (1765), published in Lima, Peru. Febrés destined his manual for potential parish priests. It consists of a Mapuche “arte” (i.e. grammar), in addition to a series of model sermons, prayers, a confessional, a catechism, and, as the title reveals, “a very curious Chilean-Spanish dialogue” to aid the language student. Mapuche is an indigenous language of Chile and still widely used today.

Image: Example pages from Arte de la lengua general del reyno de Chile, con un dialogo chileno-hispano muy curioso (Vining PM 5461 .F4)

Example pages from Arte de la Lengua Mexicana

Arte de la Lengua Mexicana (1693)

The Franciscan Antonio de Vázquez Gastelu was a professor of Nahuatl at the royal colleges of San Pedro, San Pablo, and San Juan in the city of Puebla de los Ángeles. Little is known about his life, except that he was probably of Basque origin. In his Arte de la Lengua Mexicana, first published in Puebla in 1689, he proposed to offer a grammar that would be accessible for true beginners. The royal colleges, since their founding in 1585, had given entry preference to low-income working classes, especially those of indigenous origin. The ability to speak Nahuatl, the linguam Mexicanam, was a minimal qualification. This explains in part the success of Antonio de Vázquez Gastelu’s simplified grammar, which would have four successive editions over the course of the next century. The edition displayed here is the second (1693).

Image: Example pages from Arte de la Lengua Mexicana (Vining PM 4063 . V3 1693)

Example pages from Arte novissima de lengua mexicana including a wheel-shaped acrostic of the author's name

Arte novissima de lengua mexicana (1753)

First edition of Carlos de Tapia Zenteno’s Arte novissima de lengua mexicana (1753), a grammar of the Nahuatl language spoken by the Central Mexican peoples, also known as Aztecs. Carlos de Tapia Zenteno was an ecclesiastical judge and professor of Nahuatl at the Royal University and Pontifical Seminary College. The 10th preliminary leaf contains a wheel-shaped acrostic on the author’s name.

Image: Example pages from Arte novissima de lengua mexicana (Vining PM 4063 .T2)

Example pages from Reglas de orthographia, diccionario, y arte del idioma othomi, breve instruccion para los principiantes

Reglas de orthographia (1767)

First edition of Jesuit Luis Neve y Molina’s Reglas de orthographia, diccionario, y arte del idioma othomi (1767), divided into three parts—a pronunciation guide, a dictionary, and a guide on how to become a fluent speaker and writer of the Otomi language, spoken near Mexico City. The author was the first to establish a proper system of characters for Otomi, which has been retained to this day.

Image: Example pages from Reglas de orthographia, diccionario, y arte del idioma othomi, breve instruccion para los principiantes (Vining PM 4147 .N5 1767)

Title page from

Grammatica Brasilica (1687)

Luiz Figueira’s Arte de grammatica da lingua do Brasilica, published in Lisbon by Miguel Deslandes in 1687, concerns the Tupi language. In the early colonial period, Tupi was a lingua franca throughout Brazil. Jesuit missionaries not only learned to speak Tupi, but they encouraged the indigenous peoples to keep it. They translated biblical stories into Tupi and produced some original work written in the language as well. When the Jesuits were expelled from Brazil 1759, Tupi was fell almost into oblivion, leaving only Nheengatu as its latter-day descendant with a significant number of speakers.

Image: Title page from Grammatica Brasilica (Vining PM 7173 .R5 1687)

Example pages from Promptuario manual mexicano

Promptuario manual mexicano (1759)

Father Ignacio de Paredes was the president of the College of San Gregorio and considered the most accomplished linguist of his day. His Promptuario manual mexicano (México: Imprenta de la Bibliotheca Mexicana, 1759) contains forty-six “platicas,” or conversations, and six sermons appropriate for the corresponding Sundays of Lent, the whole providing material in Nahuatl for every Sunday of the year. The frontispiece, showing St. Ignatius and two other priests of his order preaching to the New World, symbolized as a reclining woman, is signed Zapata.

Image: Example pages from Promptuario manual mexicano (Vining PM 4068.8 .P42 1759)

Example pages from Arte de la lengva moxa, con su vocabulario, y cathecismo

Arte de la lengva moxa, con su vocabulario, y cathecismo (1701)

Pedro Marbán’s Arte de la lengua moxa, con su vocabulario, y cathecismo, published in Lima, Peru in 1701, is the only work on the language of “los Moxos,” a tribe of Central Bolivia. All that is known about the author can be derived from the title in which he states that he has been a superior of the missions of the Moxos and Chiquitos Indians, in the province of Peru. This extremely rare volume is here presented in its original limp vellum.

Image: Example pages from Arte de la lengva moxa, con su vocabulario, y cathecismo (Vining PM 6576 .M3 1701 c.2)

Cover page of Historia de la conquista de Mexico poblacion, y progresso de la America Septentrional, conocida por el nombre de Nueva España 

Historia de la conquista de Mexico poblacion (1691)

Second edition of Antonio de Solís y Ribadeneyra’s Historia de la conquista de Mexico poblacion, y progresso de la America Septentrionalconocida por el nombre de Nueva España, first published in Spain in 1684 and several times reissued. Solís y Ribadeneyra (1610-1686) was both a dramatist and historian. His literary work includes poetry, drama, and prose, for which he is considered one of the last great writers of Spanish Baroque literature, and he influenced such diverse writers as Scarron, Victor Hugo, and Longfellow. Solís y Ribadeneyra’s Historia de la Conquista de Mexico covers the three years between the appointment of Cortés to command the invading force and the fall of the capital of the Aztec empire. It numbers among the classics of Spanish prose and was soon translated into French, Italian, and English. It remained the most important European source on Latin American history up through the first quarter of the 19th century.

Cover page of Historia de la conquista de Mexico poblacion, y progresso de la America Septentrional, conocida por el nombre de Nueva España (Vining F 1230 .S66)

Cover page of Historia de la Fundación y Discurso de la Provincia de Santiago de México de la Orden de Predicadores por las vidas de sus varones insignes y casos notables de Nueva España 

Historia de la Fundación (1596)

Dávila Padilla (1562–1604) was a Mexican-born priest who earned his Master of Arts from the University of Mexico at the age of 16. This is the first edition of his monumental Historia de la Fundación y Discurso de la Provincia de Santiago de México de la Orden de Predicadores por las vidas de sus varones insignes y casos notables de Nueva España. It is an invaluable work on the Dominican missions in New Spain from 1526 until 1592, as well as a chronicle of paramount importance for the history of colonial Mexico and the southern United States, since it contains one of earliest accounts to describe the Tristán de Luna y Arellano expedition to Florida. Padilla not only includes information on priests and their activities, but also discusses at length the belief system of Native Americans, their conversion to Catholicism, and their native tongues. Padilla wrote the book in the New World, and it is therefore from that perspective, showing interaction and acculturation of the two cultures as they forged together to assimilate. Padilla finished the work in 1592, it was to be printed in Mexico, but the merchant fleet did not appear with the necessary paper, so he took the manuscript to Spain. During his visit there, Padilla met Philip II, who appointed him Chronicler of the Indies.

Cover page of Historia de la Fundación y Discurso de la Provincia de Santiago de México de la Orden de Predicadores por las vidas de sus varones insignes y casos notables de Nueva España (Vining F 1231 .D23)

Example pages of Vera Historia including an engraving showing anacondas attacking villagers bathing in the river

Vera Historia (1599)

Ulrich Schmidl (1510-1579) was a German Landsknecht, conquistador, explorer, and chronicler. He took part in several expeditions: to today’s Argentina (Río de la Plata), to Peru as far as the foot of the Andes, and across the Río Paraná and Río Paraguay and into today’s Paraguay, and finally into southeast Bolivia. He had kept a diary during his peregrinations and first published his adventures under the German title Wahre Geschichte einer merkwürdigen Reise… in 1557. The Vera historia here presented is a Latin version which appeared in Nuremberg in 1599. His work contains mirabilia accounts of New World animals, such as a twenty-five-foot-long anaconda which coiled around natives while they bathed in the river and swallowed them.

Image: Example pages from Vera Historia including an engraving of anacondas attacking villagers while bathing in the river (Vining E 123 .S3 S58)

Map of the Gulf of Mexico from Historia de la conquista de Mexico (1790)

Map from Historia de la conquista de Mexico (1790)

This map is found in a later edition (Madrid: A. Fernandez, 1790) of Antonio de Solis’s prose classic, Historia de la conquista de Mexico, first published in 1684.

Image: Map from Historia de la conquista de Mexico showing the Gulf of Mexico c.1790 (Vining F 1230 .S691w 1790)

Map from The history of America showing South America

Map from The history of America (1777)

This map is from the first edition of William Robertson’s The History of America (London): W. Strahan, 1777). Books I-VIII treat the history of the discovery of America and the conquest of Mexico and Peru, while Books IX-X discuss the history of Virginia and New England.

Image: Map from The history of America showing South America (Vining E 143 .R62 v.1)

Engraving from Histoire de la conquête du Mexique ou de la Nouvelle Espane showing Cortez sinking ships

Histoire de la conquête du Mexique ou de la Nouvelle Espane (1691)

The Histoire de la conquête du Mexique ou de la Nouvelle Espane, published in Paris in 1691, is a first-edition French translation of Antonio de Solís’ popular work (1684). It was translated by Samuel de Broë and it is illustrated by fourteen plates, engraved by Moïse-Jean-Baptiste Fouard. The plates represent, among other things, the island of Cuba, Cortés’ forces descending into the valley and the Battle of Otumba, a map of the city of Mexico, the temple of Mexico, as well as scenes of sacrifice and dance.

Image: Engraving from Histoire de la conquête du Mexique ou de la Nouvelle Espane showing Cortez sinking ships (Vining F 1230 .S71 1691)

One Body: Preserving a Diverse Legacy

Photo of the exhibits wall showing photo panels and descriptions as well as the exhibits case

One Body: Preserving a Diverse Legacy

The Gordon College Archives and the Multicultural Initiatives Office (MIO) is proud to present a collaborative exhibit celebrating the stories of diverse students throughout Gordon College's and Barrington College's history. 

This exhibit couldn't have been completed without the help of the following Archives and MIO interns:

Claire Hoag (2022)
Olivia D'Souza (2021)
Joanna Echtenkamp (2021)
Brianna Rivera (2022)

Gordon College Archives Manager, Sarah Larlee St.Germain, also created a Scot Talk for Homecoming 2021 to talk a little bit about the exhibit. You can check out the video on the Gordon College YouTube page. 

Map of the world in yellow with black dots on certain countries. These countries match up where people featured live(d).

Where in the World?

This map gives an overview of where in the world the alumni highlighted in this exhibit come from. 

  • Alice (Wentworth) Douglin - Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Daniel Janey - United States
  • Deighton Douglin - United States
  • Emmanuel Arango - United States
  • Freda Obeng-Ampofo - Ghana; United States
  • Ingrid Orellana Mathew - El Salvador
  • Marie Patfoort - Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Patricio Confesor - Philippines
  • Samuel Tsoi - Hong Kong; United States
  • Sastra Chim-Chan - Cambodia
  • Silvio Vazquez - Argentina; United States
  • Sumant Ramteke - India
  • Veronica Lanier - United States

Yearbook photo of Patricio Confesor (1926)

Patricio Confesor (1926)

From: Cabatuan, Iloilo, Philippines

Patricio “Pat” Confesor (1900-after 1955) graduated from Gordon College in 1926. After graduating, Confesor traveled back to his home in the Philippines and became a pastor of a Baptist Church. During the early 1940s, he contracted tuberculosis and had to step back from his ministry work. Around this same time, World War II began, and Pat and his family, his wife and four children, joined the underground resistance group on the island of Panay and he quickly became the leader of the group. He soon learned that the air in the mountains that the resistance group was located in was good for his tuberculosis and he made a speedy recovery. At one point, his eleven-year-old daughter was captured by the Japanese, but she was able to escape captivity and reunited with her family on Easter.

On October 20, 1944, General Douglas MacArthur landed in Leyte, Philippines. MacArthur then put Confesor in charge of reorganizing the Filippino government. Confesor when on to serve as Governor of Iloilo Province in 1945 and was elected to the House of Representatives in 1949 where he served a term from 1950-1953. Through his time serving in the House, Confesor continued with ministry.

Article about Patricio Confesor in The Gordon

Twenty-Five Years Later – Article on Patricio Confesor

Article in the June 1951 edition of The Gordon, an alumni publication, featuring an update on Patricio Confesor since his graduation from Gordon 25 years earlier. The article elaborates on his experience as an underground leader in the Philippines including when his 11-year-old daughter and her nurse were captured by the Japanese.

Yearbook photo of Sumant Ramteke (1940)

Sumant Ramteke (1940)

From: Kolhapur, India

Before coming to Gordon, Sumant Ramteke (1889-1955) grew up in Akola, India, where, at age seventeen, he was one of the founders of the Marathi Christian monthly magazine, Suvrutta Prasar. This magazine would later become the “mouth-piece of all the missions in Berar and Khandesh.”

After graduating from Gordon College in 1940, Ramteke returned to India where he became pastor of the Wilder Memorial Church in Kolapur. He also served as the Secretary of the Christian Endeavour Union of India, Burma and Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) from 1943-44. Over the next eight years, he served as District Superintendent (Evangelist) of Kodoli District.

Starting in July 1952, he served as the pastor of Christ Church in Poona. Besides working in ministry, Ramteke wrote and translated an abundance of Christian literature, served on the Revision Committee of Pandita Ramabai’s Bible and the Marathi Hymn Book. He also enjoyed painting, writing poetry, and playing the organ.

The strain of working in a “large, and not always united, city church” had taken a toll on Ramteke. He was taking insulin regularly and doctors warned him that his “heart might give way at any moment.” Despite, all this, he continued on, undaunted. On December 4, 1955, Ramteke preached twice and then went to preside over a special function. It is noted that, “Before his message concluded he was visibly having difficulty, but insisted on finishing.” As he was pronouncing the “Amen” of the benediction, he collapsed on the floor and died while on route to the hospital. At his funeral, the officiating pastor remarked that Ramteke was like “Jonathan, who fell on the battlefield with sword in hand.”

Read a short write-up on Ramteke written by Fred Schelander. Fred's article/letter starts on page 54.

Article in the Gordon Alumni News that speaks about Sumant's death

Indian Pastor and Christian Leader Dies After Preaching – Article about Sumant Ramteke

Article in the February 1956 edition of the Gordon Alumni News relaying the information about Sumant Ramteke’s death. It gives information on the life of Sumant as well as an abridged version of the letter received from Sumant’s wife notifying the College of his death.

Yearbook photos of Deighton and Alice (Wentworth) Douglin (1950B)

Deighton and Alice (Wentworth) Douglin (1950B)

From: Lowell, MA (Deighton); Watsa, Congo Belge, Africa (Alice)
Majors: Pastor’s Course (Deighton); General Bible Course (Alice)

Deighton and Alice (Wentworth) Douglin met at Barrington College where they graduated from in 1950. After graduating, Deighton went to Taylor University to be trained as a teacher and Alice went to Belgium. Eventually, he mailed Alice an engagement ring and her American roommate placed the ring on her finger. In July of 1953, Alice and Deighton were married in New Jersey and from there they started on their journey as missionaries in the Democratic Republic of Congo. During their time as missionaries they were often at great personal risk from robberies, attacks, and even volcanic eruption, but this didn’t stop them from serving as school teachers and administrators in Goma.  

In 1974, they took a two-year furlough from the missionary field, when their son, David, began attending Gordon College. Deighton also took this opportunity to attend Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. In 1992, they left the Congo, only to return two years later in 1994 to help Rwandan refugees in the Congo. They stayed for a short period of time and returned to Massachusetts.

Alice also wrote an autobiography titled Daughter of the Commandant: An Autobiography of Alice Wentworth Douglin in 2005. It tells her story from being adopted by American missionaries, working in a medical clinic, coming to America, meeting and marrying Deighton, to serving as missionaries in the Congo.

In 2016, the Douglin’s were awarded the A.J. Gordon Missionary Service award for their decades of missionary work.

Pages from the 1950 Barrington Yearbook titled Torch. It features a photo of Deighton Douglin in the bottom row as well as a small note that he wrote to the former owner of the yearbook.

1950 Torch Yearbook (Barrington)

Page from the 1950 Barrington College Torch Yearbook featuring Deighton Douglin. His photo is in the bottom row on the right page and is signed with a note from him.

Cover of Alice (Wentworth) Douglin's autobiography

The Commandant's Daughter

Alice’s autobiography follows her life from childhood to present (as of 2005) from being adopted by American missionaries, working in a medical clinic, coming to America, meeting and marrying Deighton to serving as missionaries in the Congo. On loan from the Hamilton-Wenham Public Library. This copy is a circulating copy so if you are interested make sure to check it out in the new year.

Image: Cover of The Commandant's Daughter

Yearbook photo of Veronica Lanier (1954)

Veronica "Ronny" Lanier (1954)

From: West Medford, MA

Veronica “Ronny” Lanier (1918-2014) graduated from Gordon College in 1954. While at Gordon, she was active in the literary society and Commuters Fellowship as well as the Children’s Chapel leader, Sunday School teacher, and Assistant worship leader at the First Baptist Church in Medford. She also served as a Girl Scout Leader in West Medford.

After graduating from Gordon, Lanier was commissioned as a missionary by the American Baptist Home Mission Society in 1957 and served in Denver, Chicago, and Sacramento. She then joined the American Baptist Churches of Massachusetts and oversaw the children’s curriculum and teacher training. In 1964, she had a severe heart-attack and was told by her doctor that she would have only 30 minutes left to live. However, that was not the case and Lanier was later ordained by the American Baptist Church in Massachusetts in 1970. She was only the second black woman to be ordained by an American Baptist Church in Massachusetts and only the seventh woman to be ordained by a Baptist denomination in the decade leading up to her ordination. 

Other roles that she filled through out her life time include, Pastor Emeritus at First Baptist Lynn for 16 years, interim pastor for several churches, and received an honorary doctorate from the American Baptist Seminary of the West. Lanier was also a “do it yourself person” and had self-taught skills such as building furniture, sewing, knitting, pattern design, and rug-hooking. She even taught herself how to play the organ.

Learn more by visiting

Yearbook photo of Marie Patfoort (1967)

Marie Patfoort (1967)

From: Belgian Congo (Democratic Republic of Congo)
Major: Education

Marie Patfoort graduated from Gordon College in 1967. Before coming to Gordon, Patfoort lived in the Belgian Congo (now the Democratic Republic of Congo) where she meant alumnus Dr. Winifred Currie ‘45. Currie was working at the Assembly of God mission where Patfoort spent her teen years helping to educate the younger children there. Unfortunately, in 1960, her education came abruptly to a halt as the Congo Crisis began. The Congo Crisis was a period of political upheaval occurring immediately after the country became independent from Belgium and lasted until 1965. Due to her mixed heritage, Patfoort was in danger and Dr. Currie smuggled her out of the Congo to the United States. Not long after escaping the Congo, Patfoort graduated with a degree in education and was the first Congolese woman to receive a college degree in education.

After graduation, Patfoort found herself as a 5th grade teacher in Whitefield, Maine. Two years later, she was asked by the government of Zaire (now Democratic Republic of Congo) to return to Africa to teach. She did return, but only stayed for two years in order to return to the US before her window of opportunity to become a citizen closed. Once she was back in the United States, she went on to continue teaching in Maine. She retired from teaching in 1994.

You can learn more about Patfoort's story by reading Life History of Marie Patfoort. The site includes photos and audio recordings of Patfoort telling her story. 

Yearbook photo of Daniel Janey (1972)

Daniel Janey (1972)

From: Boston, MA
Major: Social Work

Daniel Janey (1949-2019) graduated from Gordon College in 1972. After Gordon, he worked for two years at the Roxbury Children Services and volunteered at the Hawthorne Youth Community Center where he later served for thirty years as Chairman of the Board.

In 1975, he received a Master’s in Social Work from Boston College while working for the Department of Mental Health for the Commonwealth of MA. He worked as a forensic social worker for thirty-two years. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Janey worked at the Dorchester Court Clinic and later became the director. After retiring from the Commonwealth, Janey represented Quincy Mental Health Care Center and worked with inmates in Norfolk County to ensure that they were connected with services after they were released. 

Janey also worked on political campaigns, for the national and Boston chapters of the Black Social Workers organization, and as an adjunct professor at Lesley University (1995-1998) and Bunker Hill Community College (1999-2001).

Amongst his many talents, Janey was also an “avid fisherman, collector of knives, sweater vests, kitchen equipment, music, black bags, and knowledge.” He was also famous at his church for his bread.

Yearbook photo of Silvio Vazquez (1987)

Silvio Vazquez (1987)

From: Buenos Aires, Argentina; Skillman, New Jersey
Major: History

Silvio Vazquez is a 1987 Gordon alumnus and a first-generation college graduate. A native of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Vazquez grew up in central New Jersey and came to faith through the ministry of Young Life. After graduating from Gordon, he began working for Young Life in Ridgefield, CT, directing outreach to junior high and high school students while coaching high school soccer. In 1989, he returned to Gordon College and embarked on a 20-year career with the College.

At Gordon, Vazquez served as an Admission’s Counselor (1989-1992) before moving into the role of Director of Annual Giving and Special Gifts (1992-1995). From there, he worked as the Director of Alumni, Parent, and Church Relations (1995-1998), Dean of Admissions (1998-2003), and Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing (2003-2009). During his tenure in admission and enrollment, the College experienced growth in enrollment, especially among international and underrepresented students. Vazquez was instrumental in helping launch the New City Scholars Program, which today is known as the Clarendon Scholars Program.

Upon leaving Gordon, he worked as a consultant for one of the nation’s top higher education consulting firms, Scannell & Kurz, Inc. In 2011, he became the Dean of Admissions at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California and held that position until 2017, when he was hired as Wheaton College’s first Chief Enrollment Management Officer. A role he holds to this day.

Vazquez received his M.B.A. from Boston College in 2003. He has served as a panelist and speaker at various professional higher education conferences and as an Enrollment Commissioner for the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU). He has contributed articles to University Business and Private Colleges and Universities as well as alumni publications for Gordon and Wheaton, and has served on the board of the Rockport Chamber Music Festival in Rockport, MA.

He currently resides in Wheaton, IL with his wife, Tara, and their three sons.

Learn more about Vazquez by reading Telling the Story: Silvio Vazquez Steps into CEMO Role or watch his talk titled The Fragrance of Life.

Yearbook photo of Sastra Chim Chan (1994)

Sastra Chim Chan (1994)

From: Cambodia
Major: Political Science and International Affairs

As a boy, Sastra Chim Chan watched as the Khmer Rouge seized control of Cambodia in 1975 and as Vietnamese troops invaded Cambodia in 1979. According to recollections from his father, Chim Chan served as a government soldier under the Vietnamese occupation before joining the anti-Vietnamese resistance.

In 1989, he was accepted into a training program for human rights advocates at Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Human Rights. He then made his way to Gordon in 1991 and graduated with a degree in political science and international affairs in 1994.

After his time at Gordon, Chim Chan returned to Cambodia to work in human rights and joined the UN Center for Human Rights. Later, he went to Rwanda to investigate human rights abuses. A colleague of Chim Chan’s said, “He went to repay a debt” because he felt that “Cambodia owed the world for all the help it had received from other countries.” Tragically, Chim Chan’s life was cut short at the age of 34, when he was shot in a suspected Hutu ambush on Feb. 4, 1997. He was believed to be the first Cambodian human rights monitor to die abroad. He is remembered for his passion, idealism, and his fearlessness. In June of 1998, a small village in the Kompong Chhnang province of Cambodia opened a primary school, donated by fellow UN workers, named the Chim-Chan Sastra primary school.

Learn more about Sastra Chim-Chan by reading the articles listed below or visit his legacy page.

Cover of the Summer 1997 Stillpoint featuring a photo of Sastra with former Gordon professor Peter Stine.

Stillpoint 1997

Cover of the Summer 1997 Stillpoint which acted as a memorial of sorts for Sastra Chim Chan who had passed away in February 1997. It includes stories, photos, and a touching tribute to Sastra. This edition of the Stillpoint is available on the 4th floor of Jenks Library in the Periodical’s Hallway or can be accessed in the Gordon College Archives. Sastra is pictured on the cover with former Gordon professor Peter Stine.

Photo of Samuel Tsoi

Samuel "Sam" Tsoi (2007)

From: Hong Kong; Boston, MA
Major: International Affairs

Samuel Tsoi graduated from Gordon College in 2007 and was a part of the Clarendon Scholars’ first cohort. Having immigrated to the US from Hong Kong when he was 8-years old, he decided to study abroad at Peking University in China during his time at Gordon. During this time, he “discovered a passion for dialog around racial reconciliation as well as honest and real conversations about who we are as people and as a country with so many differences.”

After graduating, Tsoi went on to get a M.S. in Public Affairs from the University of Massachusetts Boston (2012); completed a graduate certificate in Nonprofit Management & Leadership at Tufts University (2013); and completed advanced courses at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Tsoi worked for a number of organizations involved with immigration, immigrant communities, and international relations. In 2016, he was a part of the RISE San Diego Fellows program which is a “community development organization”. Then in 2017, he began work at Welcoming San Diego which is a city initiative “to effectively integrate immigrants into the economic, civic and cultural fabric of our community.” He was also the Assistant Director or 21st Century China Center which helps prepare future leaders “for constructive dialog on U.S. relations with China.” Most recently, he became the Equity Impact Manager for the County of San Diego’s Office of Equity and Racial Justice.

Learn more about Tsoi by visiting the article about him in The Bell and the article Someone San Diego Should Know

Photo of Freda Obeng-Ampofo

Freda Obeng-Ampofo (2008)

From: Ghana; Worcester, MA
Major: International Affairs

After graduating from Gordon College in 2008, Freda Obeng-Ampofo has kept busy. She has worked with trade, international business, and project management organizations including the European Union, American World Services Corporation, and Futures Group International under the USAID Health Policy Initiative (HPI/HPP). Most recently, she has been working for Kaeme, an indigenous Ghanian beauty and cosmetic company specializing in personal and skincare products offering a range of natural shea butter and liquid black soap products. Obeng-Ampofo was recently featured on the Richard Quest Show through CNN International and CNN Business for the way she handled her workers during the pandemic.

During her time at Gordon she was a part of the Clarendon Scholar’s program then known as the New City Scholar program. She also participated in ISO (International Student Organization), was a part of the Gospel Choir, and was a short distance sprinter for the Track and Field team. As a part of her final year at Gordon, she was able to gain admission to the America Studies Program in Washington, D.C. Of this experience, Obeng-Ampofo recalls, “This experience not only gave me an opportunity to have my feet in the professional world even before I graduated from college, but also allowed me to make lots of contacts and network in DC where I hoped to eventually work after Gordon.”

In her spare time, Obeng-Ampofo enjoys running marathons across the globe not only to keep fit, but to also get to know and learn about other cultures while also raising money for charity. She is also on the Board of Directors and Chair of Programs for Ahaspora, a group of Ghanians who have gone to school or worked abroad and are now “back home to make a difference,” and is a part of the Organizing team for the Accra International Marathon.

Learn more by reading her story on The Bell. You can also watch Freda Obeng-Ampofo Speaks to CNN or Freda Obeng-Ampofo’s Journey as KAEME Business Owner.

Photo of Emmanuel Arango

Emmaneul "Manny" Arango (2010)

From: Boston, MA
Major: Biblical Studies

At age 13, Manny Arango preached his first sermon at a juvenile detention center in Roxbury, MA. Fast forward to 2010 and Manny graduated from Gordon College with a B.A. in Biblical Studies. Shortly after graduation, he was ordained by Jubilee Christian Church in 2011 and is still the Youth Pastor there. He also works for New England Community Services, is the Youth Pastor for World Overcomers Christian Church, and runs a blog. He has also taught in England, Grenada, and Hawaii.

Arango describes himself as “a Bible nerd, a storyteller, a troublemaker, an overcomer, and a revivalist. Passionate about fighting for people who have lost their voice, Manny strives to inspire those who have lost hope or have settled for mediocre.”

Learn more about Arango by visiting his website. You can find more photos, stories, and videos there. 

Photo of Ingrid Orellana Rivera

Ingrid Orellana Mathew (2015)

From: El Salvador
Major: Business Administration

Ingrid Orellana Mathew graduated from Gordon College in 2015. During her time at Gordon, she was the Student Director of the International Student Organization (ISO) for three years. She also played a large role in the development of the International Orientation program and an international mentorship program. It was during this time that “she discovered a love for her fellow international students and a desire to shepherd new cohorts through the process of acclimating to the United States and to Gordon.”

After graduation, she became Gordon’s Director of International Student Services, a role she has held since August 2015. She also received a Master’s of Leadership in Education from Gordon in 2020.

Her favorite Bible verse is Joshua 1:9 “Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” She says, “Living in a foreign country, speaking a foreign language – away from family and home was hard but the Lord would always bring to my mind Joshua 1:9 through people, peers, friends, and my own parents so it became the encouragement and the reminder I needed when I was feeling low or overwhelmed.”

Pin that features a blue star with an open bible at the center. Each point of the star has a letter: G B M T S.

Gordon Lapel Pin

A Gordon Bible Missionary Training School (GBMTS) lapel pin (c.1903-1907). The pin features a blue star with an open bible at the center. Each point of the star has a letter: G B M T S. It was given to Waldon Corbett (Class of 1948) by Irene Baker.

Photo of the Dudley Bible Institute Class of 1928. Three men stand in the back row while two women sit in chairs in the front row.

Dudley Bible Institute Class of 1928

The Dudley Bible Institute (later Barrington College) class of 1928. 

Pictured:

(Back Row) Gaetano Buttaro, Edward Cheney, Stephen Ciccorilla
(Front Row) Verna Rapp, Nina Gregg

White t-shirt with blue outlined block letters spelling out Clarendon. 15th Anniversary is written underneath.

15th Anniversary T-Shirt

In 2018, these special t-shirts were printed to celebrate the 15th Anniversary of the Clarendon Scholars program. On loan from the Multicultural Initiatives Office (MIO).

Commencement sash for students of African descent. It has different African prints in yellows, reds, greens, and blacks.

Commencement Sash (African)

A Commencement sash given out by MIO to all graduating multicultural students. This sash is for African Heritage students. On loan from the Multicultural Initiatives Office (MIO).

Clarendon Scholars Pin. It has a cityscape featured in the middle with

Clarendon Scholars Pin

Clarendon Scholars Commencement pin (2019) given to graduating Clarendon Scholars students. On loan from the Multicultural Initiatives Office (MIO).

Commencement Sash for students of Hispanic descent. It has stripes of colors in hues of green, blue, pink, white, red, orange, black, and yellow

Commencement Sash (Hispanic)

A Commencement sash given out by MIO to all graduating multicultural students. This sash is for Hispanic Heritage students. On loan from the Multicultural Initiatives Office (MIO).

ALANA (stands for African, Latin, Asian, Native, Allies) t-shirt with the logo used for 2013-2019. The logo is triangular with a rectangle in the middle. The outer triangle parts are in blue and the two middle rectangular parts are in yellow and orange.

ALANA T-Shirt

A t-shirt from the student organization ALANA which stands for African – Latin – Asian – Native – Allies. This shirt includes the old logo that was used from 2013-2019. On loan from the Multicultural Initiatives Office (MIO).

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